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Hoover Parks in the US

July 15th, 2009 by admin

Leisure in the Name of Hoover

Herbert Hoover, America’s 31st president, is a man that was one of the most industrious presidents in the history of the United States of America. Upon being elected in 1929, Hoover inherited the daunting task of stopping the downward spiral that eventually became the infamous Great Depression. While this remains one of the most obvious and well known facts about Hoover, there were a number of other events that he directly influenced. Perhaps the greatest of these projects were the humanitarian efforts that Hoover implemented during and after World War I. In August, 1914, Hoover helped to organize the safe return of some 120,000 American citizens from Europe. Later, he led a group of volunteers that often worked 14 hour days distributing food to survivors in war torn London. Hoover also made huge efforts to feed starving people in Europe following the war. These efforts often adversely affected Hoover’s image in the eyes of senate Republicans and ultimately the American public.

As a result, Hoover is a shining example of doing the right thing even when it is not good for you. Hoover also made monumental strides in the recognition of the significance of nature in America as he set aside 3 million acres of national parks and 2.3 million acres of national forest.

Even today, we can all take a moment to enjoy some of these places which are now part of Hoover’s legacy. In honor of Hoover’s contribution to the national parks system, we will take a whirlwind tour of some of the parks named in his honor and explore some of the things that they have to offer.

Hoover Park in West Branch, Iowa

The first stop on our tour is in the town of West Branch, Iowa. This small town in eastern Iowa is Hoover’s hometown and is home to Hoover National Park. Located at 110 Parkside Drive, Hoover National Park hosts the two room house that Hoover was born in, the presidential library and museum, the gravesite of Herbert Hoover and his wife, Lou Henry Hoover, and a restored tract of tallgrass prairie. This park represents a distinct opportunity to learn more about the Hoover chapter of American history and to see what made Hoover the man that he later became.

Hoover Park in Newberg, Oregon

The next stop in our journey is in the city of Newberg, Oregon. This city has the distinction of being the place that Hoover called home between 1885 and 1888. In his honor, the city constructed a park. This park is significantly different than the last Hoover park we visited. Instead of offering a taste of history, this park offers a scenic place to have a picnic as well as a short but technical disc golf course.

Hoover Park in Palo Alto, California

Palo Alto, California hosts the next stop on our tour of Hoover’s parks. Nature is the dominant force in this park. Located at 2901 Cowper Street in Palo Alto, Hoover Park allows visitors to enjoy approximately 4.2 acres of open grassy areas as well as a dry creek bed. For those who just aren’t that into nature, Hoover Park also includes tennis courts, handball courts, a tennis backboard, softball field, barbecue pits, a dog run, playgrounds that include climbing structures, swings, and monkey bars.

Hoover Park in Redwood City, California

Finally, the last stop in our journey to appreciate Hoover and his contributions to the park system in America takes us to Redwood City, California. Hoover Park, located at the intersection of Woodside Road and Spring Street in Redwood City, is a 10.18 acre park that is bursting with activities to offer a fun seeking person. This park offers a pool, soccer fields, baseball fields, a football field, playground equipment, barbeque pits, and basketball courts. Hoover Park in Redwood City also has ample parking located next to the park.
As you can see, Hoover left a lasting impression on the state of leisure activities in the United States. In his name, we should all take a moment to enjoy nature and spend a little family time in the outdoor areas made available by and in the name of President Hoover.

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